How does rhythm affect the poem?

What is the meter?

Similar to songs or songs, poems have one rhythm.
So they tend to be slow, aggressive, or lively.

The rhythm is mainly created by the meter certainly.
The meter is the pattern in which stressed and unstressed syllables alternate.

Take a look at the following video and you will find out everything about the meter:

If you want to read the information about the meter again, then continue here ...

The iambus

The iambus is two-syllable.
The first syllable is unstressed, which is the second syllable stressed.

Both syllables are marked with a cross.
Since the second syllable is stressed, it is marked with a check mark.

The trochee

The trochee is also two-syllable.
The first syllable is stressed, which is the second syllable unstressed - the exact opposite of the iambus.

Since the first syllable of a trochee is stressed, it is marked with a tick.

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The dactyl

The dactyl is three-syllable.
Only the first of the three syllables is stressed.
So the pattern is: stressed - unstressed - unstressed.

Since the first syllable is stressed, it is marked with a check mark.

The anapaest

The anapest is also three-syllable.
Only the last of the three syllables is stressed.
So the pattern is: unstressed - unstressed - stressed.

Since the last syllable is stressed, it is marked with a check mark.

Set syllables

The best way to determine the number of syllables is to think about how the word is spoken.
You can also clap to help.

The spoken syllables apply to meter.
This means that the word “but” consists of two spoken syllables.
However, you must not separate it when spelling.

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Define stressed syllables

Think about which ones natural emphasis could have the floor.
Say the word to yourself a few times with different intonations.
In German, the first syllable of two-syllable words is often stressed (= first or main syllable stress).
In the following word, the first syllable is stressed, for example in Tables: "Tisché" (with an emphasis on the second syllable) would also sound really unnatural!).

Some syllables in German are as good as never stressed. These include, for example ...

  • the prefixes "ge", "ver", "ent-"
  • or the endings "-e", "-en", "-er".

Examples of this are the words:
Poem, crazy, kidnapped, tables, run, men.

Only in the rarest cases consequences two stressed syllables on each other.