Can I use art for car design

We actually wanted to build more curves, "remembers Wolf Prix," so that the ramp in the Munich BMW World becomes more dynamic. But the managers were scared. "

"Anxiety?"

"Before accidents. At BMW they thought that when the customers who pick up their cars in Munich finally get the ignition key after the whole show, they'll be so upset that they can no longer drive straight. Not to mention Curves. "

So the show.

Prix ​​laughs on the phone. He is head of the globally successful architecture office Coop Himmelb (l) au. The Himmelblauen built the spectacular BMW World seven years ago. 70,000 square meters full of restaurants, a museum, a technology park and a car transfer station, including an and here-now-your-key show. The ensemble in the north of Munich consists of steel, glass and that velociferic dream that illuminates the 20th century. A glow is as if it came from gigantic xenon headlights.

The love for the car has grown cold

Or: it was a glow. Because the dream is about the car as a carrier of culture and an object of desire. It's over. The BMW world wanted one, maybe even the the last temple of this love for the automobile. However, it was built before love was already cold again after a century of frenzy, longing for the horizon, the joy of being on the road for a long time on streets that can turn the immobilized imprisonment in suburban semi-detached houses into an exciting road movie. Theoretically.

It is the old dream of freedom that has only become tangible in the modern age thanks to its individualized mobility promises. At the same time, this is the engine not only of an entire industry, but also that of Germany in particular. But then sales collapsed across Europe. In August a year ago, the number of sales fell to its lowest level since statistics began a quarter of a century ago.

Oldtimer artwork

Even the car dealerships in Germany, which will soon have to grapple with online competition, may soon earn more money from changing tires and air filters than from selling new cars artificially pushed through all sorts of discount campaigns. Old cars, on the other hand, old and young timers, are coveted collector's items. Nostalgia alone cannot be the reason for this booming market. Old cars are collected and loved like old art. Why? Because they are art that you can love. New cars on the other hand. . . but that's exactly what it's about.

What significance can a car have if you are constantly stuck in a traffic jam of the collapsing infrastructure? What image does the car have, whose advocates at the ADAC have to resort to lies and falsified numbers like Viagra in order to win some erotic attractiveness from their old love? What does it mean when the driving schools report that fewer and fewer people are interested in getting a driver's license? And how could one get young city dwellers excited about a car that they no longer have to own in the sharing economy?