What are some down-to-earth neutral baby names

The naming of the mines was subject to certain "fashions" over the centuries. In the time of tunnel mining, these often indicated the venture of the company. Trusted in God, good luck, freshness and the like. Names came up frequently. The reason was insufficient knowledge of the geology of the deposit. Animals were also popular (at times recommended as a designation by the Oberbergamt) or more mythological names.
With the underground mining a fundamental change occurs, beginning around the middle of the 19th century. Since there was now a much greater financial risk due to the more complex technology, investors became more and more important. The first stock corporations came into being, whose share certificates were then called Kuxen. As an honor, the plants were given the names of the most important financiers (e.g. Friedrich Thyssen, Grillo, Carl Funke) or their origin (e.g. Holland, Neu-Iserlohn, Mansfeld). Courting around nobles and politicians, who were downright begged for permission to use their names, was particularly popular. This practice was especially common at the time of the establishment of the German Empire in 1871 with all of its attendant circumstances. At the same time, important shafts were given the first names of mine directors, wives of the owners or other "deserving" personalities.
The Prussian state was rather sober, which at the beginning of the 20th century sank or acquired its own mines, mainly north of the Emscher, in order to maintain its own supply base, for example for the state railroad. Here the mines were named after their location (e.g. Scholven, Waltrop, Westerholt). In recent years, when the coal phase-out was closed, remaining operations were very pragmatically merged to form mines West, Lippe or East.
The following overview should be completed as far as possible.


Naming after people

Often they were named after the names of entrepreneurs or the first names of family members. There were also "honors" given to members of the supervisory board or people in similarly exposed positions.
Naming after nobles was a special case. The consent of the respective person was requested with flattering to slimy inquiries. This variant was common from around 1850 to 1880. This was certainly related to the founding of the German Reich and the nationalist mood that went with it. This also applies to the patriotically motivated designations below.


Nobles, civil servants

Adolf von Hansemann
Adolph (von) Hansemann (born July 27, 1826 in Aachen; December 9, 1903 in Berlin) was a German entrepreneur and banker. Elevated to hereditary nobility on March 8, 1872 by Kaiser Wilhelm I. One of the richest Germans of his time.

Arenberg continuation
Prosper Ludwig von Arenberg (born April 28, 1785 in Enghien; February 27, 1861 in Brussels), Duke of Arenberg, Aarschot (Aerschot) and Meppen, Prince of Recklinghausen, Count von der Marck, etc. was Prince of the Holy Roman Reiches, holder of the Grand Cross of the Belgian Order of Leopold, the Dutch Order of Lions, the Prussian Order of the Black Eagle, the Bavarian Order of St. Hubert and the Order of St. Michael, officer of the French Legion of Honor, as well as colonel of the regiment of the "Belgian Chevaulegers" [strongly reminiscent of today's politicians with various Supervisory board seats].

Auguste Victoria
Princess Auguste Viktoria (also Victoria) Friederike Luise Feodora Jenny of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg VA (born October 22, 1858 in Dolzig, Niederlausitz; April 11, 1921 in the Doorn house, Netherlands) was the last wife of Wilhelm II German Empress and Queen of Prussia.

Blucher
Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, Prince of Wahlstatt (born December 16, 1742 in Rostock; September 12, 1819 in Krieblowitz, Silesia), was the Prussian field marshal and played a key role in the victory over Napoleon in Waterloo.

Caroline
Friederike Karoline (or Caroline) Wilhelmine von Baden (born July 13, 1776 in Karlsruhe; November 13, 1841 in Munich) was a princess of Baden and since January 1, 1806 the queen of the newly proclaimed Kingdom of Bavaria.

Frederika
Friedrich II., Also known as Friedrich the Great or the Old Fritz, (born January 24, 1712 in the Berlin City Palace; August 17, 1786 in Potsdam) was King in 1740 and of Prussia from 1772 as well as Elector of Brandenburg.

Frederick the Great
Friedrich II., Also known as Friedrich the Great or the Old Fritz, (born January 24, 1712 in the Berlin City Palace; August 17, 1786 in Potsdam) was King in 1740 and of Prussia from 1772 as well as Elector of Brandenburg.

Friedrich Wilhelm
Friedrich Wilhelm III. (* August 3, 1770 in Potsdam; June 7, 1840 in Berlin) was King of Prussia from 1797 and, as Margrave of Brandenburg, also Elector of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806.

Prince Hardenberg
Karl August Freiherr von Hardenberg (also: Carl August von Hardenberg; born May 31, 1750 in Essenrode, today an apprenticeship; November 26, 1822 in Genoa) was a Prussian statesman who came from the Electorate of Hanover, the von Hardenberg family. He was Prussian Foreign Minister from 1804 to 1806 and State Chancellor from 1810 to 1822; In 1814 he was raised to the rank of prince for his services.

Prince Leopold
Anholter nobleman Nikolaus Leopold Joseph Maria Prince of Salm-Salm (1838-1908). Holder of shelf rights at the time of the speculation.

general
Franz Sigismund Freiherr von Elverfeldt (born December 23, 1640; 19. January 19, 1712), General of the Prince-Bishops of Münster

General Blumenthal
Leonhard Graf von Blumenthal (born July 30, 1810 in Schwedt an der Oder; December 22, 1900 at Gut Quellendorf near Köthen) was a Prussian field marshal.

Gneisenau
August Wilhelm Antonius Graf Neidhardt von Gneisenau, born August Wilhelm Antonius Neidhardt (born October 27, 1760 in Schildau, Electorate of Saxony; August 23, 1831 in Posen, Province of Posen) was a Prussian field marshal and army reformer (see Prussian reforms). As Blucher’s chief of staff, he played a key role in the victory at Waterloo.

Count Beust
Ernst August Graf von Beust (born November 21, 1783; February 5, 1859) was a Prussian geologist and mining official and the first mining captain of the Rhenish Higher Mining Authority.

Count Bismarck
Otto Eduard Leopold von Bismarck-Schönhausen (count since 1865, Prince von Bismarck since 1871, Duke of Lauenburg since 1890; * April 1, 1815 in Schönhausen; July 30, 1898 in Friedrichsruh near Hamburg) was from 1862 to 1890 Prime Minister of Prussia and at the same time Chancellor of the North German Confederation from 1867 to 1871 and first Chancellor of the German Empire from 1871 to 1890, the establishment of which he played a key role.

Count Moltke
Helmuth Karl Bernhard Graf von Moltke, called Moltke d. Ä., Also known as "the great silent" (born October 26, 1800 in Parchim; 24. April 24, 1891 in Berlin) was a Prussian field marshal and, as chief of the general staff, played a major role in the Prussian / German victories in German-Danish War, in the Austro-Prussian War and in the Franco-German War.

Count Schwerin
Victor Graf von Schwerin (born December 22, 1814 in Schwerinsburg; November 18, 1903 there; full name Victor Friedrich Wilhelm Hermann Luther Graf von Schwerin) was a German manor owner from Pomerania and a Prussian politician.

Humboldt
Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von Humboldt (born September 14, 1769 in Berlin; May 6, 1859 in Berlin) was a German natural scientist with a field of activity that extended far beyond the borders of Europe. In his oeuvre, which unfolded over a period of more than seven decades, he created "a new level of knowledge and reflection on knowledge of the world" and became a co-founder of geography as an empirical science.

Julia
possibly Countess Julia Friederike v. Hohenzollern-Hechingen (* March 27, 1792 in Brandys (Brandeis); July 1, 1864, Illenau)

Empress Augusta
Augusta Marie Luise Katharina von Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach (born September 30, 1811 in Weimar; January 7, 1890 in Berlin) was the wife of Kaiser Wilhelm I, German Empress and Queen of Prussia.

Catherine
Friederike Katharina Sophie Dorothea von Württemberg (alternative spelling Katharine Sophie Friederike Dorothee von Württemberg; * February 21, 1783 in Saint Petersburg; November 28, 1835 in Lausanne) was married to Napoléon Bonaparte's youngest brother, Jérôme Bonaparte, and was married from 1807 to 1813 Queen of Westphalia.

Catherine
Friederike Katharina Sophie Dorothea von Württemberg (alternative spelling Katharine Sophie Friederike Dorothee von Württemberg; * February 21, 1783 in Saint Petersburg; November 28, 1835 in Lausanne) was married to Napoléon Bonaparte's youngest brother, Jérôme Bonaparte, and was married from 1807 to 1813 Queen of Westphalia.

King Ludwig
Ludwig II. Otto Friedrich Wilhelm of Bavaria (born August 25, 1845 at Nymphenburg Palace, Munich; June 13, 1886 in Würmsee, today's Starnberger See, near Berg Castle), from the German Princely House of Wittelsbach, was on March 10 1864 King of Bavaria until his death. After his incapacitation on June 10, 1886, his uncle Luitpold took over government as Prince Regent. Ludwig II has set himself a monument in Bavarian history as a passionate castle builder, including one from Neuschwanstein, which is why he is popularly referred to as the fairy tale king.

King Wilhelm
Wilhelm I (born March 22, 1797 as Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig in Berlin; März March 9, 1888 ibid) von Hohenzollern had been regent since 1858 and king of Prussia since 1861 and German emperor from 1871.

Queen Elisabeth
Elisabeth Ludovika, Princess of Bavaria (born November 13, 1801 in Munich; December 14, 1873 in Dresden) was the wife of Friedrich Wilhelm IV. Queen of Prussia.

King Wilhelm
Wilhelm I. (* March 22, 1797 as Wilhelm I. (* March 22, 1797 as Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig von Prussia in Berlin; March 9, 1888 ibid) from the House of Hohenzollern was regent since 1858 and king of Prussia since 1861 as well from 1871 German Emperor.

Crown Prince
Friedrich Wilhelm IV. (Born October 15, 1795 in Berlin; January 2, 1861 in Potsdam) was the eldest son of Friedrich Wilhelm III. von Prussia and Luise von Mecklenburg-Strelitz. After the death of his father, he took over the government on June 7, 1840 and was King of Prussia until shortly before his death. Due to illness, he passed the reign on October 7, 1858 to his brother Wilhelm I.

Maria Anna - also called Marianne
Wife of the Royal Chamberlain Clemens August Freiherr von Elverfeldt (born January 25, 1732, Münster; April 13, 1783).

Maximilian
Maximilian II. Joseph (born November 28, 1811 in Munich; March 10, 1864 there) was a German prince from the Wittelsbach family and from 1848 to 1864 King of Bavaria.

Minister Achenbach
Heinrich Karl Julius Achenbach, von Achenbach since 1888, (born November 23, 1829 in Saarbrücken, Rhine Province; July 19, 1899 in Potsdam, Brandenburg province) was a German mining lawyer and Prussian politician.

Minister Stein
Freiherr vom und zum Stein (painting by Johann Christoph Rincklake) Heinrich Friedrich Karl Reichsfreiherr vom und zum Stein (born October 25, 1757 in Nassau; June 29, 1831 in Cappenberg, Westphalia) was a Prussian civil servant, statesman and reformer.

Möller
Theodor Adolf Möller (von Möller since 1905; * August 10, 1840 at Gut Kupferhammer near Brackwede; December 6, 1925 there) was a German entrepreneur, politician and from 1901 - 1905 Prussian Minister of Commerce (subsequently raised to the nobility). He pushed through the purchase of mines by the Pussian state against the opposition of the economy.

president
Friedrich Ludwig Wilhelm Philipp Freiherr von Vincke (born December 23, 1774 in Minden; December 2, 1844 in Münster) was a Prussian reformer.

Prince Wilhelm
possibly Prince Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig of Prussia (born October 30, 1794 in Berlin; July 27, 1863 in Berlin) was royal Prussian general of the cavalry and division commander.

Prince Regent
Wilhelm I (* March 22, 1797 as Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig von Prussia in Berlin; March 9, 1888 ibid) from the House of Hohenzollern had been the regent of the House of Hohenzollern since 1858 and King of Prussia since 1861 and German Emperor from 1871.

Prince of Prussia
Wilhelm I (* March 22, 1797 as Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig von Prussia in Berlin; March 9, 1888 ibid) from the House of Hohenzollern had been the regent of the House of Hohenzollern since 1858 and King of Prussia since 1861 and German Emperor from 1871.

Prosper
Prosper Ludwig von Arenberg (born April 28, 1785 in Enghien; February 27, 1861 in Brussels), Duke of Arenberg, Aarschot (Aerschot) and Meppen, Prince of Recklinghausen, Count von der Marck, etc. was Prince of the Holy Roman Reiches, holder of the Grand Cross of the Belgian Order of Leopold, the Dutch Order of Lions, the Prussian Order of the Black Eagle, the Bavarian Order of St. Hubert and the Order of St. Michael, officer of the French Legion of Honor and Colonel of the "Belgian Chevaulegers" regiment [note: typical accumulation of offices].

Rheinbaben
Georg Kreuzwendedich Freiherr von Rheinbaben (born August 21, 1855 in Frankfurt (Oder); March 25, 1921 in Düsseldorf) was a Prussian politician and, among other things, district president in Düsseldorf.

Scharnhorst
Gerhard Johann David von Scharnhorst (born November 12, 1755 in Bordenau, today part of Neustadt am Rübenberge; June 28, 1813 in Prague) was a Prussian general. Alongside August Graf Neidhardt von Gneisenau, he was - as chairman of the Military Reorganization Commission since July 1807 - the decisive organizer of the momentous Prussian army reform. Since he most clearly recognized the connection between military reform and social change, he is still considered to be the most exemplary of the military reformers of the time of the wars of liberation.

Our Fritz
Friedrich III., With his full name Friedrich Wilhelm Nikolaus Karl von Prussia (born October 18, 1831 in the New Palace in Potsdam; June 15, 1888 ibid), was German Emperor and King of Prussia for 99 days. He was a Prussian general in the German and French-German wars.

von der Heydt
August Freiherr von der Heydt (born February 15, 1801 in Elberfeld, today's Wuppertal; June 13, 1874 in Berlin) was a banker and Prussian trade and finance minister under King Friedrich Wilhelm IV.


Officials, entrepreneurs, shareholders

Brassert
Hermann Friedrich Wilhelm Brassert (born May 26, 1820 in Dortmund; March 16, 1901 in Bonn) was a Prussian lawyer and mining captain. He worked out the Prussian mining law of 1865 and was editor of the magazine for mining law.

Carl Funke
Carl Funke (born August 22, 1855 in Essen; April 15, 1912 in Ems) was a German entrepreneur.

Christian Levin
It was named after the then General Director of the Cologne Mining Association, Christian Lemmé Lévin.

de Wendel
Henri Paul François de Wendel (born March 24, 1844 in Hayange; October 10, 1906 Vaugien Castle, St. Remy les Chevreuse) was an industrialist and a member of the German Reichstag. His brother Robert was the second name giver of the Heinrich Robert colliery.

Diergart
Friedrich Freiherr von Diergardt (born March 25, 1795 in Moers; May 3, 1869) was a Rhenish industrialist and silk manufacturer.

Ewald
Ewald Hilger, entrepreneur from Essen (born October 14, 1833 in Lennep, today Remscheid; June 12, 1887 in Badenweiler during a cure). Founded the Essen Actien brewery, which later became the Stern brewery. He studied mechanical engineering and brought his own factory into Essener Maschinenbau AG Union, which was taken over by Krupp in 1913.

Friedrich Heinrich
Friedrich Heinrich Freiherr von Diergardt (* 1820; 1887)

Friedrich Thyssen
Johann Friedrich Thyssen (born October 1, 1804 in Aachen; May 25, 1877 in Eschweiler) was an entrepreneur and local politician in Eschweiler and the father of the industrialist August Thyssen.

Franz Haniel
Johannes Franciscus (Franz) Haniel (born November 20, 1779 in Ruhrort, today Duisburg; April 24, 1868 ibid) was a German entrepreneur and namesake of Franz Haniel & Cie. GmbH.

Helene & Amalie
Helene Amalie Krupp (born July 10, 1732; May 9, 1810) can be regarded as a co-founder of the Krupp empire. After the death of her husband Friedrich Jodocus Krupp (1706-1757), she earned the capital with the inherited colonial goods trade, which formed the basis of the later Krupp works.

Hugo Haniel
Hugo Honigmann (born August 19, 1833 in Essen; 1879) Essen merchant and first chairman of the mining board

Hugo
Hugo Carl Julius Haniel (born January 2, 1810 in Ruhrort; 15.December 1893) was the successor of his father and entrepreneur Franz Haniel. After the death of his father in 1868, Hugo Haniel continued to run the Franz Haniel company.

Gottfried Wilhelm
Johann Gottfried Wilhelm Waldthausen (born July 15, 1765 in Essen; April 28, 1844 in Essen) was a German merchant, mine operator and member of the industrial family Waldthausen.

Grimberg
Heinrich Grimberg (born June 26, 1833 in Bochum; March 24, 1907 ibid) was a Bochum mining entrepreneur.

Grillo
Fritz Grillo, actually Heinrich Friedrich Theodor Ernst (born December 20, 1825 in Essen; April 16, 1888 in Düsseldorf) was a German industrialist who had a decisive influence on the development of the Ruhr area during the early days of the company.

Jacobi
Hugo Jacobi (born November 28, 1834 in Osterfeld (Oberhausen); October 17, 1917 in Düsseldorf) was a German engineer and mining industrialist.

Julius Philipp
Julius Philipp Heintzmann (born September 29, 1745 in Clausthal; November 17, 1794 in Weile near Hattingen) was a royal Prussian mountain ridge.

Knowledge
Gustav Mevissen, since 1884 Gustav von Mevissen (born May 20, 1815 in Dülken, Rhine Province; August 13, 1899 in Bad Godesberg) was a German entrepreneur and politician. Starting with textile production, Mevissen invested in railway construction and heavy industry.

Pattberg
Heinrich Pattberg (born August 8, 1862 in Mülheim an der Ruhr; 5. May 5, 1934 in Moers-Kapellen) was mine director of the Rhine Prussia colliery.

Robert Müser
Robert Müser (born October 12, 1849 in Dortmund; October 30, 1927 there) was a German mining entrepreneur. He headed the Harpener Bergbau AG, which his father co-founded.


Terms from mythology and patriotism

Baldur
Germanic god of justice, light, goodness, purity, beauty

Bonifatius (also Bonifacius)
Wynfreth (also Wynfnith, Winfrid, Winfried, * 672/673, no later than 675 in Crediton near Exeter in the then small kingdom of Wessex, today's county of Devon, in south-west England; June 5, 754 or 755 near Dokkum in Friesland), was one of the most famous missionaries and the most important church reformer in the Franconian Empire. Since the Reformation he has been called the "Apostle of the Germans" by the Catholic Church.

Borussia
neo-Latin for Prussia

Carolus Magnus
Charlemagne in Latinized form

Concordia
Concordia is the goddess of unity in Roman mythology (corresponds to Harmonia in Greek mythology). According to the ancient Roman belief, it promotes and maintains the unity and unity of the citizens of Rome. She was depicted with the attributes of a cornucopia, an offering bowl and hands entwined with one another.

Constantine the Great
Flavius ​​Valerius Constantinus (* on February 27 between 272 and 285 in Naissus, Moesia Prima; May 22, 337 at Nicomedia, Bithynia et Pontus), also known as Constantine the Great, was Roman Emperor from 306 to 337.

Castel Sant'Angelo
The Castel Sant'Angelo in Rome was originally built as a mausoleum for Emperor Hadrian (76-138) and his successors and was later expanded into a refuge for the popes.

flora
Flora is the goddess of flowers in Roman mythology, especially of the grain blossom.

Germania
Germania is the national personification of Germany. Since the Middle Ages there has been a reference back to Germania or the Magna Germania of antiquity or the reference to the area of ​​distribution of the German language. The most famous representation shows the Niederwald monument in the pompous style of the imperial era.

Hannibal
Hannibal, also Hannibal Barkas, Phoenician: Baal is gracious, (* around 246 BC in Carthage; 183 BC in Bithynia) is considered one of the greatest generals of antiquity. During the Second Punic War (218-201 BC) he inflicted several severe defeats on the Roman Empire.

Hercules
Herakles or Hercules (Greek He-rakle-s: "He who gained fame from Hera", Latin Hercules) is an ancient Greek national hero who was famous for his strength, received divine honors and was accepted into Olympus. He was the god of healing and oracles, patron of the gymnasia (sports facilities) and palaces. He was a protégé of Athena.

Pluto
Pluto (Greek Pluton) is the Roman name of the Greco-Roman god of the world of the dead in the depths of the earth. He largely corresponds to the Greek god Hades. In contrast to Hades, Pluton was worshiped variously together with Demeter and Kore. A sanctuary of Pluton is called a Plutonion.

Prussia
Kingdom from 1701 and largest federal state in the German Empire

Radbod
According to the first mining director from Friesland, the colliery is Bergassessor a. D. Heinrich Janssen was named after the Frisian Duke Radbod.
Possible naming after Radbod von Trier (also Radpod or Ratbod) (* unknown; March 30, 915). He was Archbishop of Trier from 883 to 915. The colliery's financiers came from Trier.

Tremonia
Latin name for Dortmund

Victoria
In Roman mythology, Victoria is the deified personification of victory (Latin victoria), protective goddess of the Roman emperor and virgin guardian of the empire. She is the equivalent of the Greek goddess Nike.

Westphalia
Today, Westphalia is the eastern part of North Rhine-Westphalia, which essentially comprises the area of ​​the former Prussian province of Westphalia. Westphalia is the ancient Latinized spelling.


Naming according to place or location

The place of the tunnel mouth hole was often used as the name for the colliery in the mining industry.
Large corporations and the Prussian state (e.g. for supplying the railways) were involved in the cost-intensive establishment of companies in the central and northern Ruhr area. These usually named the mines after the closest place - at that time often just villages. Naming according to the origin of the donors was less common.


Financiers
Hamburg, Hanover, Hansa (Commerzbank Lübeck - headquarters of the Hanseatic League), Holstein, Lorraine, Mansfeld, Neu-Iserlohn, Neu-Wesel, Saxony, Schleswig

local reference (place / homestead / district / location) or global geographic
Alma, Alstaden, Altendorf, Alter Hellweg, Beeckerwerth, Borth, Bruchstrasse, Dorstfeld, Eiberg, Emscher-Lippe, Hagenbeck, Haus Aden, Ickern, Lohberg, Neumühl, Oberhausen, Oespel, Osterfeld, Polsum, Pörtingssiepen, Rahm, Recklinghausen, Rhineland, Rheinelbe, Rheinpreußen, Rönsberghof, Rosenblumendelle, Rossenray, Scholven, Sellerbeck, Sprockhövel, Sterkrade, Vondern, Walsum, Waltrop, Wehofen, Werne, Westhausen, Westerholt, Wiesche, Wolfsbank, Wulfen, Zollern, Zweckel

relative position
At their facility, Nordstern (GE-Horst) was the northernmost and Westende (DU-Meiderich) the westernmost colliery, Westphalia (Ahlen) was the furthest north-east and isolated from the actual Ruhr area, more like part of the Münsterland.


Naming after animals

Many tunnel operations in the Sprockhövel / Haßlinghausen area had animal names. Many businesses were set up here without a name, as a laisser-faire principle existed until 1739. This changed only with the Prussian mining law with clear rules. The mining authority asked the mines to name themselves. Animal names should be used. Only a few of these tunnel operations later became larger civil engineering systems.
Eagle, old hare, free bird, frog, fox, lion, lynx, bustard, whale


Financiers
Hamburg, Hanover, Hansa (Commerzbank Lübeck - headquarters of the Hanseatic League), Holstein, Lorraine, Mansfeld, Neu-Iserlohn, Neu-Wesel, Saxony, Schleswig


Naming purely pragmatic or unclear

There were some mines with names that could not be clearly clarified or with neutral names. In addition, there are companies organized from several individual plants in order to reduce the remaining coal stocks.

Bergmannsglück, German Emperor, Germany, Carolinenglück, Consolidation, Emscher-Lippe, Peaceful Neighbor, Schlägel & Eisen

organizational units of DSK - Bergwerke Lippe, Ost, Rheinland, West